Jaw-Dropping Jupiter: Juno Probe Snaps Dramatic Up-Close Views of Planet

New photographs by NASA’s Juno spacecraft catch the solar system’s largest planet in all its complex glory.

The four photos — that Juno took over an 8-minute interval on Sept. 1, during its most recent close flyby of Jupiter — reveal the gas giant’s many cloud bands and innumerable swirling storms (although not the famous Great Red Spot).




“In the times the pictures were taken, the spacecraft ranged from 7,545 to 14,234 kilometers (12,143 to 22,908 km) in the tops of the clouds of the world at a latitude selection of -28.5406 to -44.4912 levels,” NASA officials wrote in a description of these pictures. You may see more amazing photos of Jupiter from Juno here.

The new photos really represent a collaboration between Juno and citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt Sean Doran, who processed raw imagery collected by the probe’s JunoCam tool within these dramatic, color-enhanced viewpoints.

New photographs by NASA’s Juno spacecraft catch the solar system’s largest planet in all its complex glory.

The four photos — that Juno took over an 8-minute interval on Sept. 1, during its most recent close flyby of Jupiter — reveal the gas giant’s many cloud bands and innumerable swirling storms (although not the famous Great Red Spot).




“In the times the pictures were taken, the spacecraft ranged from 7,545 to 14,234 kilometers (12,143 to 22,908 km) in the tops of the clouds of the world at a latitude selection of -28.5406 to -44.4912 levels,” NASA officials wrote in a description of the pictures. You may see more amazing pictures of Jupiter from Juno here.

The new photos really represent a collaboration between Juno and citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt Sean Doran, who processed raw imagery collected by the probe’s JunoCam tool within these dramatic, color-enhanced viewpoints.

NASA encourages anyone to procedure Juno pictures in this way. If you are interested, visit the JunoCam page here: https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam.

Since that time, the spacecraft was analyzing the giant planet’s structure, composition, and magnetic and gravitational fields, collecting data that mission scientists say should shed light on Jupiter’s formation and development.

Juno is in a highly elliptical orbit which brings it close to the world once every 53.5 Earth days. The spacecraft collects all its information during these moves that are close; it’s now completed eight of these.

Juno is scheduled to keep studying Jupiter through July 2018, although the probe will not necessarily stop operations then; NASA could wind up granting an expanding assignment.

Credit: Nasa



Scientists Reveal Mysteries on the Night Side of Venus

Credit: ESA

scientists have studied clouds and wind on the night side of Venus and they have found that it is very different from the day side.

That info comes from ESA’s Venus Express spacecraft, which entered orbit around Venus in April 2006 prior to being crashed into Earth in December 2014.

We already knew that Venus has a bizarre super-rotation, where its winds can rotate 60 times faster in the world. However, it appears that on the other hand, this procedure is even more chaotic than on the day side.

“This study challenges our current understanding of climate modelling and, particularly, the super-rotation, which is a vital phenomenon found at Venus,” said Håkan Svedhem, ESA Project Scientist for Venus Express, in a announcement.

This mosaic illustrates the atmospheric super-rotation at the upper clouds of Venus. While the super-rotation is present in both day and night sides of Venus, it seems more uniform in the day (AKATSUKI-UVI image at 360 nm, right side), while in the night this seems to become more irregular and unpredictable (composite of Venus Express/VIRTIS images at 3.8 µm, left). Credit: ESA, JAXA, J. Peralta and R. Hueso Credit:phys.org

The team found that night side clouds form large, irregular patterns, dominated by waves that seem to stand still in the air, called stationary waves. In January this year, a huge stationary wave was seen on Venus from the Akatsuki spacecraft, stretching for over 10,000 km (6,200 miles).

They discovered they did not proceed with the air, an unexpected discovery that was later verified by Akatsuki.

Stationary waves are considered to form over mountainous or other high-elevation areas. Weirdly though, in this information static waves were missing in the intermediate and lower cloud levels, up to approximately 50 km (31 miles) above the surface.

“We expected to get these waves at the lower levels because we see them at the top levels, and we believed that they climbed up through the cloud in the surface,” co-author Ricardo Hueso of the University of the Basque Country in Bilbao, Spain, from the announcement. “It is an unexpected result for certain, and we will all need to reevaluate our versions of Venus to explore its significance.”

Akatsuki is continuing to orbit Venus, so it could have the ability to shed some light on some of the bizarre things happening with the planet. With the passing of Cassini now, Venus is currently one of just 3 planets apart from Earth — the others being Mars and Jupiter — that have a human spacecraft in orbit.

“Holy Grail” Metallic Hydrogen Is Going to Change Everything

“Holy Grail” Metallic Hydrogen Is Going to Change Everything

Taken From Nasa Website

Two Harvard scientists have succeeded in creating an entirely new material long thought to be the “holy grail” of physics — metallic hydrogen, a substance of unparalleled energy that could one day propel people into deep space.

This broke down the molecule from its solid state and enabled the particles to dissociate into atomic hydrogen.

The ideal rocket fuel we now have is liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, burnt for propellant. The efficacy of these substances is characterized by “specific impulse,” the measure of impulse gas may give a rocket to propel it forward.

“People at NASA or the Air Force have advised me that if they could find an increase from 450 seconds [of particular impulse] to 500 minutes, which would have a enormous effect on rocketry,” Isaac Silvera, the Thomas D. Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences at Harvard University, told Inverse by telephone. “If you are able to activate metallic hydrogen to recover to the molecular stage, [the energy release] calculated for that’s 1700 seconds.”

Metallic hydrogen could potentially enable rockets to get into orbit in one point, even allowing individuals to explore the outer planets. Metallic hydrogen is called to be “metastable” — meaning if you make it in a really significant pressure then release it, it is going to remain at that pressure. A diamond, for instance, is a metastable form of graphite. If you choose graphite, pressurize it, then heat it, it will become a diamond; should you take off the pressure, it is still a diamond. But if you heat it again, it is going to revert back to graphite.

Scientists first theorized atomic rust a century ago. Silvera, who created the material together with post-doctoral fellow Ranga Dias, was pursuing it since 1982 and working as a professor of physics at the University of Amsterdam.

Metallic hydrogen has also been called to be a high- or maybe room-temperature superconductor. There are no other known room-temperature superconductors in existence, meaning the software are immense — particularly for the electrical grid, that suffers for energy lost through heat dissipation.

It might also facilitate magnetic levitation for autonomous high-speed trains; considerably improve performance of electrical cars; and reevaluate the way energy is generated and stored.

But that is all still likely a few decades off. The next step concerning practical application is to find out if metallic hydrogen is really meta-stable. If the substance does prove to be meta-stable, it may be used to make room-temperature crystal clear and — by spraying atomic hydrogen on the surface –use it like a seed to grow longer, how synthetic diamonds are created.